JET Program

I often rave about it as the best way to come to Japan as an English teacher because it really is. I was on JET from 1992-95, then I was the JET Alumni President for my local Canadian chapter, and I was on the interview panel as well. I have seen a lot of people come on the JET program and it has been the kick-start to a lot of careers.

Of course there are those who say it was not a good fit for them, or that it was just something cool to do while they were gearing up for something different. And all of that is perfectly cool. JET is not meant to be a career, but it can be something that you can springboard off of.

I made a couple of videos on the JET program and I encourage hopeful newcomers to Japan to really explore this option carefully before just signing on with any ALT contract that gets thrown at you.

Language Learning Process

escher-stairs-art-1140x640This is a kind of a dry topic, but it is a very important concept to understand if you are someone who is trying to master a second language. If you have ever been in a language class, or tried to learn a new language on your own in your spare time, you know how horrible the process is. You study and study and study and make almost no progress. You try again. You study and study more. You buy books and CDs and DVDs. You join more classes. You watch TV in the language you want to learn. You buy new pens and notebooks. Special notebooks. Special pens.

But you feel like you don’t know anything. All your efforts so far, all your special stationary supplies are a waste. The sit on your desk and you feel like they are mocking you, like they are laughing at you.

You have failed.

But. Wait.

You have not failed. You have actually made some progress, even if you don’t know it. Even if you don’t feel it. You have, in fact, learned something. In your brain. Deep in your brain there is the vocabulary that you have studied. It lies deep in your head, but it cannot come to the front of your brain, and out of your mouth yet. It needs to be revisited. It needs to be reviewed. It needs to be forced a little more. It needs to be polished up.

Researchers have shown us that in order for a foreign word to become natural for us to use it requires seven or eight reviews. It needs seven or eight contextual uses so that it becomes natural for you, and then you will recognize it as having been learnt.

Learning language is not like anything else, and the closest proximity we can find is the study of music. Music needs practice and rehearsal. Endless practice and rehearsal until it sounds natural and spontaneous. We hear the “voice” of great pianists and guitarists. They are smooth and seamless. It is because they practice like crazy. Of course there are the very unique few who can learn language or music instantly, but for the rest of the peons like me and you, we have to plod along, endlessly, relentlessly. We have to be like a dog with a bone.

Like a dog with a bone.

This is the year of the dog. Language study is the bone.

That parallel just fell into this article. How cool is that?

So, learning language is incremental, and unromantic. It needs time and persistence. Knowing that is a powerful thing, and it is liberating too. If anyone says, “You studied language for so long, why don’t you speak it yet?” The only answer is, “I am still practicing.”

Those are the same words spoken by martial arts masters in Japan. They never claim mastery, even though to the outsider they are completely flawless. They are “in the midsts of learning”. Surely we can take that to heart in our own study, whatever it is we are trying to learn.

Language learning is not fun.  We need the building blocks of language–vocabulary. And lots of it. We have our students write out vocabulary lists. They make vocabulary cards. We drill the vocabulary. We quiz them. We review and review and review and review.

Then…. we can build some sentences. And that is the fun part. We can choose simple grammatical structures and drop in a verb, drop in a noun, drop in an adjective. Instantly we are using language, playing with language, and reviewing it. We can learn a more complex pattern, something with prepositions. Drop in a verb, a noun, an adjective, and jump it around. The kids can see how easy, and fun it can be.

It’s fun because they master something. It’s fun because they really KNOW something. And what they have played with in a variety of forms gets reviewed. Soon it gets to seven or eight times of usage and they can keep that part of language in their minds. Forever.

Then review it all one more time.

Then get out the vocabulary worksheets, the cards, and do it all over again.obras-de-echer-6-728

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!

It is a very exciting time for us at englishbiz. This year promises to bring a few new projects to life, as well as move our company and schools further down the road of becoming stronger and of better service to our students and community.

0f5b75c5-47a9-4d0e-a050-84bdec687c98Last year, in our English classrooms, we experimented with developing an EIKEN JUKU. For those of you do not know what that is, “Eiken” is the name of a series of English tests that kids can take from an early age and the difficulty extends upwards to full fluency. The “Jr” levels are Bronze, Silver, and Gold, and then from there the ranks go 5, 4, 3, pre-2, 2, pre-1, and 1. The “Junior Eiken” levels are primarily for elementary school kids and then from junior high the “Adult Eiken” program kicks in. The word “Juku” means “cram school”. So, what we have in essence created, is a cram school environment for kids working through the “Eiken” ranks.

We did not know what to expect, but it has been a booming success for our school. The parents want it, the kids need it, and there is no one anywhere in Takamatsu City who has done it. This really hit home for us that we were on the right path of making a serious, and seriously enriching and enjoyable, English learning school and environment. We were very very excited when the results came in that 98% of our kids could pass their Eiken examinations and advance to the next stage. There is nothing like real success that can give kids the confidence they need to learn.

While other schools are twirling ribbons, and screaming, and running about with unruly kids, we managed to model, demonstrate, and guide kids towards a better way of learning, REALLY learning, and not just “experiencing” English. I am proud of our school and our team for this success. We will make certain it extends to reach more kids for 2018.

The other area where we saw some incredible success was with our experimental English Daycare called “Little DaVincis”. This was a brainchild of my wife, and we decided to start very small and to see where it would lead us. We made the facility inside the largest language school we ran and hired staff to work with us. It has been a very adventurous start, and we are still in the first year of its inception. There is a growing demand for bilingual daycares in our city, so we are considering carefully if this is another service we can provide better.

Looking ahead to 2018, there is a new project that we have decided to work on, and this is concerned with developing and finding teachers who are either looking for their next placement, or who need the skills and certification that Japanese Immigration authorities require for work visa permission. We contacted iTTi in New York and have secured exclusive rights with them to run their TESOL program here in Japan. The first session will be a 120 hour certification program in Osaka in July. Details will follow on this page, so please let us know if you are interested in this. We are keeping the class size small so we can manage the quality and effectiveness of it, so seats will be limited for the first year anyway.

Thanks so much for coming by! Thanks for the emails and kind comments, and friendly support. It means a lot to me to be connected to great educators and thoughtful people. Teaching English overseas as a career is a wonderful ride, and it is a great pleasure to be on it with you.

Let’s make 2018 big big fun!

Yours,

Mark

The Die is Cast

Ok, so here is where we are at with the TESOL course preparations. The ink is drying on the contract that I have received and we are ready to move ahead. Our initial plan is to start our first TESOL course in July of 2018, and we will set up in OSAKA.

The reason for this is that it is very accessible for anyone coming to Japan, or already living in Japan. The Kansai Airport is within an hour of the downtown area, and Osaka is a major hub for the entire country. Tokyo is great, and if this would be your first time to Japan, it is a “must-go” to location. I highly recommend a few days in Tokyo to get in the sights and sounds of that massive concrete megacity.

Osaka is significant because it is also just a stone’s through from Kyoto. We are going to set up the TESOL course so that we will have some intense sessions for a few days, and then cut you guys loose for a few days in a row. This is essential to let you have the time and space to explore the country, and to really see some of the most significant sights of Kyoto, Osaka, and beyond.

We also hope to have plenty of leads with companies and language schools that are looking for qualified teachers to work with. That is another important thing that we need to do our best in terms of preparing you for life after you get your TESOL certification. Part of getting you ready for life in Japan is to also sort out your CV, and consult with you about strategies for the next step of your career. We have some ideas, but need to hear from you as well in terms of what you are looking for, what ages do you feel most comfortable teaching, and what kind of contracts or length of time you wish to put into an ESL teaching position.

There are many things to formalize and to let you know about, but details are coming! Drop me a line at englishbiztakamatsu@gmail.com if you have any questions!

Talk more soon!

Mark

TESOL: Coming Soon

1503452082tesol-language-learningThis is a very exciting time for our company. We are in the midst of making a significant step forward in developing a TESOL certification program for prospective teachers. We are realizing that to be of best service we need to reach out in two directions as a company and school.

One is, of course, to the kids that we see in our classrooms. They need a very serious and well designed English program, and they deserve to get something better than what they currently get in school. That is our mission as a school.

The other, now that we have the size and clout to do so, is to develop something good for people who are planning to live and work as English teachers in Japan. Towards that end, we are in the finalizing stages of getting our company’s TESOL (Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages) certification. When the paperwork is resolves we will be able to hold training sessions for teachers looking to teach in Japan.

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Our plan is to host the training sessions, give prospective teachers opportunities to do “on-site” teaching and get some experience, get them through the certification process, and then to help get them placed in real ESL jobs. Of course we cannot guarantee placement of jobs, as it is really up to the interviewee to wow their prospective employer, but we will do what we can to set things up properly in that regard. After all, it is great to come to Japan to get your TESOL certificate, but you really want to land the job that will keep you here, right?

Watch this blog for updates. They are coming soon, and we are getting all our ducks in a row to move ahead with this project for 2018! Would very much like to see you here, so if you have interest in coming for a training session with us, they are short term (2 days), one week (7 days), or 120 hours (over one month period), drop me a line at englishbiztakamatsu@gmail.com .

In the meantime, take care and enjoy the festive season, which is just around the corner from today!!

 

 

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